Get to Know Your Ingredients: Triclosan

Triclosan

Can also be listed as:

5-CHLORO-2- (2,4-DICHLOROPHENOXY) PHENOL; PHENOL, 5-CHLORO-2- (2,4-DICHLOROPHENOXY) -; 2,4,4′-TRICHLORO-2′-HYDROXY DIPHENYL ETHER; 5-CHLORO-2- (2,4-DICHLOROPHENOXY) – PHENOL; PHENOL, 5CHLORO2 (2,4DICHLOROPHENOXY) ; 2,4,4′-TRICHLORO-2′-HYDROXYDIPHENYL ETHER; 5-CHLORO-2- (2,4-DICHLOROPHENOXY) PHENOL; CH 3565; IRGASAN; IRGASAN DP300; PHENOL, 5-CHLORO-2- (2,4-DICHLOROPHENOXY) –

The FDA announced last week that it will review the safety of triclosan after the urging of Massachusetts Congressman Ed Markey.  Triclosan is found in antibacterial products such as soap, hand sanitizer, clothing, shoes, deodorants, toothpaste, cutting boards, sponges, toys, and cosmetics. Studies have shown that triclosan is an endocrine disruptor and enables bacteria to become antibiotic-resistant.

Triclosan is so prominent, the CDC states that it is found in 75% of the population’s urine.  The American Medical Association advises against the use of antibacterial soap at home to prevent the creation of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.  Antibacterial soap has been found no more effective than regular soap.

Triclosan is in drinking water and a large percentage of rivers.  The EPA does not regulate levels of triclosan in drinking water.

The European Union has a ban on triclosan for products that come in contact with food.

Triclosan is a listed ingredient in products.  Depending on the type of product, you can find it listed in the Drug Facts box or in the ingredient list.

Get to know what your products contain.  You can limit your triclosan intake.